Murder

All the Colors of the Dark (1972)

Rating: 68

Tags: Murder - Mystery - Erotica - Giallo

Director: Sergio Martino

Producers: Mino Loy and Luciano Martino

Writer: Ernesto Gastaldi and Sauro Scavolini

Starring: George Hilton, Edwige Fenech, Ivan Rassimov, Julian Ugarte, George Rigaud, Susan Scott, and Marina Malfatti
Country: Italy

MPAA Rating: R

Studio: Lea Film & National Cinematografica

Budget: ₤294 million

Release: February 28th, 1972

Did Ya Know: I am not sure what this means, but Italian Censorship Visa #59784 delivered on February 24th, 1972.

All the Colors of the Dark is a Giallo picture from the acclaimed film director, Sergio Martino. This Italian film stars George Hilton, Edwige Fenech, Ivan Rassimov, and Julian Ugarte. Released in Italy on February 28th, 1972 by Interfilm. And in the United All the Colors of the Dark is a Giallo picture from the acclaimed film director, Sergio Martino. This Italian film stars George Hilton, Edwige Fenech, Ivan Rassimov, and Julian Ugarte. Released in Italy on February 28th, 1972 by Interfilm. And in the United States in 1976 under the title There Coming to Get You!

Synopsis

Jane lives in London with her boyfriend, Richard. Haunted by visions of her mother's murder when she was five. And the baby she had recently lost in a car crash. Also, a mysterious knife-wielding man with icy blue eyes. Her boyfriend has her on vitamins to help curb these hallucinations. But it might be exacerbating things quite a bit. Jane’s sister recommends psychiatric care, but Richard won't hear it. Mary, a strange neighbor, suggests a satanic ritual performed at a black mass. This is what Jane chooses to go through with. But now the visions are seeming all too real. Now the nightmares are coming to life.

Analysis

I found the entire thing to be a metaphor for this depressed and bored housewife to be free and be on her own. Void of these hang-ups that haunt her. Hang-ups with a disinterested lover, an overbearing sister, and a clueless therapist. She gets this wish granted, albeit gruesomely.

The pacing and style of the film help keep the viewers disoriented. It feels very dreamlike, leaving us wondering what’s real and what’s fiction. We watch in agony as Jane tries to unravel the mystery of the stab-happy killer, but it’s torturous to watch her try and progress. You fear for Jane seeing what’s happening to this poor woman.

The music by Bruno Nicolai is good but strangely placed in weird scenes. The Black Mass is one good example of this. It’s a horrific scene with a dog being killed and drained of its blood followed by a kissing orgy. However, it’s presented with this spaghetti western type score. It’s very bizarre and a bit off-putting. But I think the filmmaker missed his mark with this scene.

The cinematography by Giancarlo Ferrando and Miguel Fernández Mila is great too. I love the lighting throughout the picture. It’s done well and it works with the vibrant colors in each scene.

Overall

All the Colors of the Dark is very reminiscent of Roman Polanski’s 1968 classic, Rosemary’s Baby. The satanic imagery and torture of a poor, mentally frail, young woman are in line with the style of that picture. It’s not presented as well. But this film hits most of the same beats. I found myself getting into it. Very impressed with the filmmaking, but generally intrigued by the story. It’s a good Giallo picture. I can safely recommend this to cinephiles, but I don’t think you would fall into it unless you had an interest in these weird little Italian flicks.