Action

Iron Man (2008) - Jon Favreau

Release date: May 2, 2008 (USA)

Director: Jon Favreau

Featured song: Driving With the Top Down

Box office: 585.2 million USD

Budget: 140 million USD

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Iron Man is a 2008 action movie based on the Marvel comic book of the same title. It’s regarded as the first film in the modern Marvel Universe. It was directed by Jon Favreau and produced by Marvel Studios and Paramount Pictures. Robert Downey Jr. takes up the lead role as billionaire playboy, Tony Stark. He is supported by a great cast; Gwyneth Paltrow, Jeff Bridges and Terrence Howard all play pretty big roles. Even Director Jon Favreau steps in front of the camera in a comedy role, as Tony Stark’s bodyguard.

Tony Stark, the multi-billionaire head of Stark Industries, had been kidnapped by terrorists following the test of his companies new “Jericho” missile. However, while held captive, Tony tricked his captors and told them he was working on a missile for their use, but instead he creates armor he can use to break out. Successful and back in the public eye, Stark vows to stop producing weapons and plans on starting his new life as the incredible Iron Man. While he was away, business partner Obadiah Stane had taken the reigns of the company. Stane had been getting very wealthy with Stark producing weapons. Especially with the double-dealings he had been making. This led to Stane taking up the mantle of Iron Monger and planning on the utter destruction of Stark.

Jon Favreau approached this movie like any other independent feature. He didn’t look at it as a big-budget blockbuster, but a smaller, more contained picture. That type of heart shows through and comes across as a passionate telling of this classic comic series. It was a gamble for studio executives, but it was a home-run for the burgeoning Marvel Studios. The visual element was jaw-dropping for the late 2000’s. I guess that isn’t surprising considering Industrial Light & Magic was involved in the effects.

The acting is amazing. Robert Downey Jr. turns in a performance that changes his entire career. He is Tony Stark now. I have been watching nearly all of these movies in the theater since this one, and I couldn’t picture anyone else more perfect for the role of a womanizing, alcoholic, rich socialite. It’s a shame that Terrence Howard only played Rhodes once. I really liked his performance in this. Don Cheadle is amazing and does a much better job, but Howard has the coolness that goes side-by-side with Robert Downey Jr. They are a good team.

I really liked Jeff Bridges as Obadiah Stane. He was silently terrifying. The lead-up to him becoming the big bad shows a great deal of good storytelling. He is manipulative and conniving. His scenes with Gwyneth Paltrow are tense. It’s was a good idea to keep this villain quieter and more subtle. It actually added to the mystery and stayed true to the comics. Stane’s first appearance in the comic books was as a shadowy figure that was working behind the scenes against Stark Industries. I liked that touch.

Iron Man is an action-packed adventure that sets the tone for the entire Marvel franchise going forward. It isn’t going to have a villain that everyone knows, but it is definitely going to entertain you on many different levels. It’s hilarious, the characters are natural and full of that signature Marvel humor. It’s beautiful, the shots are amazing and the visual effects of the Iron Man suits and battles are on point. I highly recommend it to anyone that hasn’t seen it yet. If you liked Spider-Man or X-Men then this is right up your alley.

Low Blow (1986) - Frank Harris

29/100

A forgettable action movie starring the boring ass, Leo Fong.

Director: Frank Harris

Producer: Leo Fong

Writer: Leo Fong

Starring: Leo Fong, Cameron Mitchell, Troy Donahue and Diane Stevenett

Studio: Crown International Pictures

Country: United States

Language: English

Low Blow is a 1986 action b-movie from Crown International Pictures. It was directed by schlock movie maker, Frank Harris, who has been known for his eighties garbage pictures. The film stars Leo Fong, who also served as the writer and producer. And also features performances by Cameron Mitchell, Troy Donahue, Akosua Busia and Stack Pierce. This feature is one of those “so-bad it’s good” type movies. Not intentionally made to be corny or laughable, but it just happens to turn out that way. This was released on Beta and VHS in the same year as it’s release.

Joe Wong, a former policeman turned private detective, has been hired to trackdown a runaway heiress that took off to join a new and deadly religious cult. Wong joins up with a former boxing champion and a Vietnam veteran that vow to help him on the case. Their sleuthing gets them in all sorts of brawls across the hour and a half that this movie plays out. Not a deep plot. Not a good plot. Just an excuse for dry-ass Leo Fong to try acting.

Everything about this movie is over-the-top and miscalculated. The acting is awkward and stiff. But Leo Fong is the worst. It’s such a shame that he sunk so much of himself into this film. The action, if you want to call it that, is just Fong slowly tossing people around. The best example of the terrible action is a scene where Fong has to beat up a car with a two-by-four. His attacks are so weak and faint. Interestingly enough, this movie featured the first role for fitness star Billy Blanks.

Forbidden Planet (1956) - Fred M. Wilcox

GOOD OLD SCI-FI 68/100

Director: Fred M. Wilcox (as Fred McLeod Wilcox)
Writers: Cyril Hume (screen play), Irving Block (based on a story by)
Stars: Walter Pidgeon, Anne Francis, Leslie Nielsen
Genres: Action | Adventure | Sci-Fi | Thriller
Certificate: G
Country: USA
Language: English
Release Date: 22 August 1956
Production Co: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM)
Budget: $1,900,000 (estimated)
Gross USA: $3,000,000
Trivia: The critical success of this film convinced many in the film industry that well-funded science-fiction projects could be successful. Film historian Ben Mankiewicz has claimed that this film's success made future big-budget science-fiction films possible.

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Forbidden Planet is an American science fiction film from 1956. It was helmed by Lassie Come Home director, Fred Wilcox, and produced by MGM studios. This is a classic flick. Presented with a truly beautiful picture. A product of being filmed in Cinemascope and Eastmancolor from Kodak. Forbidden Planet is a scifi retelling of William Shakespeare's classic tale, The Tempest. It's extremely cheesy and has some very questionable acting. Except for lead actors Leslie Nielsen and Walter Pidgeon. They are both great.

A rescue mission from Earth is sent to Altair IV after command loses transmission with the colony living there. Led by Commander John J. Adams, the rescue team’s spaceship sets down on the mystery planet against the warnings from Doctor Morbius, a strange man hailing the ship from the planet. The crew finds out that Morbius is one of the few inhabitants left alive, along with his daughter and their servant robot, Robbie. The other people living on the planet have been killed by a mysterious force and Morbius fears that the same may happen to the rescue team. He encourages the crew to leave with his daughter before something bad happens, but it's soon too late.

Again, the film looks amazing. I watched this in HD on FilmStruck, and it looked great. Full color. Vibrant and interesting. We can credit the amazing set design and art to Cedric Gibbons and Arthur Lonergan working in the MGM lot. It’s a trip when you realize that the entire film was made indoors. Creative shots and a lot of huge matte paintings that make the settings look so believable. There is even some great animation provided by Joshua Meador from Walt Disney Studios. I loved the art direction and effects. Not the best, but tremendous for the time. There is a well made scene that shows an invisible monster walking on steel stairs and the filmmakers added in some bending steel. It looked great.

Aside from the bigger named actors like Leslie Nielsen or Anne Francis, the acting tends to be pretty bad. But it’s not bad enough to hinder the entertainment. The acting feels more television quality, probably since most of the props and some actors turn up in the Twilight Zone a few years later. There is an aire of cheapness that hangs about the movie. Unfortunately, that’s just something that drive-in monster movies from the fifties had to deal with. The technology for science-fiction movies wouldn’t catch up until at least the seventies.

Forbidden Planet is an amazing feat of filmmaking in the mid-fifties. The effects are top quality and the filmmaking is good. It’s a movie that should be studied by film aficionados all over the world. I simply cannot recommend it enough. Some people might find the slower pace annoying or boring, but I can almost guarantee you will find something else to like about it. I had some pretty low expectations before watching this movie. I thought it would of looked a lot worse than it did. But I came away happy and fully entertained.

Total Recall (1990) - Paul Verhoeven

AWESOME SCI-FI ACTION FILM 98/100

Director: 
Paul Verhoeven  

BASED ON: 
"We Can Remember It For You Wholesale" by Philip K. Dick

WRITERS:
Ronald ShusetT, 
Dan O'Bannon,
Jon Povill and
Gary GoldmaN

Stars:
Arnold Schwarzenegger, Sharon Stone and Michael Ironside

Rating: R

Country:
USA

Language:
English

Release Date:
1 June 1990

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Total Recall is a tremendous science-fiction action film from 1990. It had been Directed by Paul Verhoeven who had helmed Robocop the prior year. And produced by Carolco Pictures and Tri-Star. Arnold Schwarzenegger is our lead actor supported by Michael Ironside, Sharon Stone and Rachel Ticotin. The story is based on a Philip K. Dick short story called "We Can Remember It for You Wholesale" and the screenplay was handled by Gary Goldman, Dan O’Bannon and Ronald Shusett. Kind of an all-star affair for 1990. This movie was a staple of my childhood, and the reason for my love of cheesy Arnold Schwarzenegger flicks. I had rented this several times from Blockbuster or Hollywood Video and also viewed is uncountable times on television. Hell, it still runs on AMC and Syfy to this day! No matter how you cut it Total Recall, is an important movie that can never be replicated.  

Douglas Quaid is a mild-mannered construction worker living on earth in 2089. He has a beautiful wife, a good job, but yearns for the stars. Something inside of Doug wants to get away. He wants to go to Mars, much to the behest of his wife and friends. Doug goes to Recall, a service that can implant a memory into your brain. A virtual vacation. However, during the operation, something is ticked and happy ol’ Douglas Quaid becomes the ruthless, cunning and deadly Hauser. A hired agent from Mars that has been suppressed with mental blocks. Now awakened to the false reality around him, and being pursued by people trying to kill him, Hauser must return to Mars to find out who wants him dead! 

The screenplay for the film was picked up by Dino De Laurentiis and shopped around Hollywood in the early eighties. De Laurentiis had tried to get the film off the ground seeking either Richard Dreyfuss or Patrick Swayze in the lead role. That would have been bad. He had gotten David Cronenberg attached to direct, but Cronenberg was hard about having William Hurt as the lead. Things just couldn’t come together and the screenplay had floundered in development hell. In 1989, the De Laurentiis Entertainment Group had folded leaving the script out in the wild. It was picked up by Carolco Pictures and the rest is history. 

Total Recall is the best science-fiction movie of all time. The acting, music, effects and writing are running on all cylinders. Arnold Schwarzenegger is the perfect fit for this role, and this was a big hit for him. The Quaid character is very complex, something that doesn’t become clear until his trip to Recall. The soundtrack was masterfully composed/conducted by a legendary musician, Jerry Goldsmith. It sets every scene with an epic beat that makes this movie a blockbuster. The main theme is unforgettable. Much better than many scores today. The special effects were handled by effects master, Rob Bottin. Bottin is famous for his tremendous work on movies like The Thing, The Howling, Robocop and Legend. He doesn’t shy away from gore and turns out some creative scenes. I would never expect less.

I really love this movie. I have seen it countless times and still love watching it frequently today. It’s the perfect film to come out of the late-eighties, early nineties time period. Arnold is a badass here. If you aren’t familiar with his work in action films, then I plead that you watch this movie along with classics like The Running Man, Predator and Conan the Barbarian. That man was entertainment in the eighties. Total Recall hits on every level and is now tame enough for early teens to enjoy. I highly recommend it. Five stars.

Lethal Weapon 4 (1998) - Richard Donner

OKAY ACTION MOVIE 65/100

Lethal Weapon 4 (65)

The worst of the franchise clocks in at the longest. A long winded action romp pitting LAPD against Triads.

Directed by:
Richard Donner

Produced by:
Richard Donner & Joel Silver

Screenplay by:
Channing Gibson

Starring:
Mel Gibson,
Danny Glover,
Joe Pesci,
Rene Russo,
Chris Rock,
Jet Li

Studio:
Silver Pictures & Doshudo Productions

Distributed by: 
Warner Bros. Pictures

Release date: 
July 10, 1998

Running time: 
127 minutes

Country: 
United States

Language: 
English

Budget: 
$100–150 million

Box office: 
$285.4 million

Lethal Weapon 4 is an action film from 1997. Most of the usual crew had returned. Director Richard Donner, Musicians Eric Clapton, Michael Kamen and David Sanborn all return along with actors, Mel Gibson, Danny Glover, Rene Russo, Joe Pesci and introduces Chris Rock and Jet Li. It’s the fourth entry to the Lethal Weapon franchise, and it happens to be the slowest paced. It’s also framed as the final entry to the series. Nostalgically capping off a tremendous action series that ran for just over a decade.

A freighter full of Chinese immigrants runs aground in Los Angeles, much to the dismay of Officers Martin Riggs and Roger Murtaugh. They are being imported by the Triads, who are trying to get their incarcerated crime bosses onto American soil and away from China. To make things worse, Murtaugh decides to stow an entire family of immigrants in his home. This puts the entire investigation in jeopardy. Also, Riggs and Murtaugh have to work with an annoying new detective, Lee Butters. Needless to say, our heroes can’t wait to kick some major Triad ass.

Lethal Weapon 4 visits Riggs and Murtaugh at a mature time in their lives. Roger’s daughter is pregnant, he is on the verge of becoming a grandfather. Riggs has also been told that Lorna is pregnant. Both guys have to face this turning point in their lives. That tone reflects the slower pace of the film. It still has explosions and car-chases as well as a good deal of character development. The relationship between Riggs and the Murtaughs is so comfortable and fun. It’s a pleasure to see the whole group interacting. I have fallen in love with the characters.

This wouldn’t be a Lethal Weapon movie without copious amounts of action. Over-the-Top action. Jet Li is a very convincing villain even though it's his first time playing one. His showdown with Mel Gibson is tremendous. It’s one of the highlights of the picture. The chase scene that doubles-up with a construction theme is another tremendous scene. Most scenes are really well shot, but lack substance. Thats a problem that echoes throughout. While it's fun nostalgically, it doesn’t have what it takes to make a good film.

This is supposed to be the final film in the franchise. It ends with the quote from our protagonists, “We’re not friends, We’re family!” Then we get a montage of production photos and a group shot of the entire crew. It’s a great send off, but what if they wanted to return? Would you hate it?

Lethal Weapon 3 (1992) - Richard Donner

PRETTY GOOD ACTION MOVIE 79/100

Lethal Weapon 3 (79)

Not the best of the franchise, but not the worst.

Directed by:
Richard Donner

Produced by:
Richard Donner & Joel Silver

Screenplay by:
Jeffrey Boam & Robert Mark Kamen

Story by:
Jeffrey Boam

Starring:
Mel Gibson,
Danny Glover,
Joe Pesci,
Rene Russo and
Stuart Wilson

Studios:
Silver Pictures
Warner Bros.

Release date:
May 15, 1992

Running time:
118 minutes

Country:
United States

Language:
English

Budget :
$35 million

Box office:
$321.7 million

Lethal Weapon 3 is an action comedy film from 1992. Director Richard Donner has returned along with screenwriter, Jeffrey Boam. Danny Glover and Mel Gibson are back as Riggs and Murtaugh. Our favorite destructive comedic cop duo. Joe Pesci makes a return as Leo Getz, now a family friend to the Murtaugh family, and Rene Russo makes her appearance as Internal Affairs agent, Lorna Cole. The love interest for Riggs. It’s not a film that fared as well as the previous entries, but it had a lot of heart. I loved this one as a kid, so I hope it holds up!

Roger Murtaugh is only eight days away from retirement. But that doesn’t mean it’s going to be an easy eight days. His partner Riggs ends up destroying a building and getting them both busted down to beat cops. Then they stumble onto a chase with some dangerous criminals that happen to be using new, lethal “cop-killer” bullets. The leader of the criminals is a former police Lieutenant that has some dirty cops on the force. Riggs and Murtaugh are reinstated to detectives and then paired with Internal Affairs agent Lorna Cole. The love interest of Martin Riggs.

In usual Lethal Weapon tradition we are treated to jaw-jacking between Riggs and Murtaugh, an awesome car-chase through Los Angeles, a housing development used as an action background, range shooting, Riggs popping his shoulder back into place and various other tropes from the franchise. It also boasts a long run-time of 118 minutes. The longest of the franchise to that point. It would be surpassed by Lethal Weapon 4, clocking in at 127 minutes.

Mel Gibson is the saving grace of the picture, his comedic performance is great. It’s always funny to see him muscling down his Australian accent. His Martin Riggs character appears to be tired, but Rene Russo is a good pairing for him. I enjoyed her action scenes just as much as Gibson’s. I didn’t care much for the villain, Jack Travis. He wasn’t memorable. But the ending fight scene between Riggs and Travis is a high-point in this production.

The filmmakers had been a bit too ambitious with Lethal Weapon 3. It felt like they had intended to amp up the main elements in the franchise, but ended up cramming too much into one package. The film goes on far too long and begins dragging about half-way through. While I had a great time watching the further adventures of Riggs & Murtaugh, I could have done with a tighter and more trimmed storyline that still provided the same amount of entertainment as the second film. Lethal Weapon 3 is still entertaining, but you can mark this as start of the decline of the series. Interestingly enough, wikipedia lists the late Carrie Fisher as a script doctor. Seven stars.

Lethal Weapon 2 (1989) - Richard Donner

REALLY GOOD ACTION MOVIE 88/100

Lethal Weapon 2 (88)

One of the greatest action films of the nineteen eighties. A must watch for every action fan.

Directed by: 
Richard Donner


Produced by: Richard Donner & Joel Silver

Screenplay by:
Jeffrey Boam

Story by: 
Shane Black & Warren Murphy

Starring: 
Mel Gibson
Danny Glover
Joe Pesci
Joss Ackland
Derrick O'Connor
Patsy Kensit

Music by:
Michael Kamen
Eric Clapton
David Sanborn

Studio:
Silver Pictures

Distributed by: 
Warner Bros.

Release date: 
July 7, 1989

Running time:
114 minutes

Country:
United States

Language:
English

Budget:
$50 million

Box office:
$227.9 million

Lethal Weapon II is a buddy-cop action film from 1989, and is the second installment to the Lethal Weapon franchise. Richard Donner returns to the helm and directs with a screenplay penned by Jeffrey Boam. Screenwriter, Shane Black had originally written the film, but he left the series due to various disputes. Both Mel Gibson and Danny Glover return as our heros, Riggs & Murtaugh. With Joe Pesci brought in to help emphasise the more comedic elements of the film. We also get another amazing soundtrack that harkens back to the first Lethal Weapon film thanks to Michael Kamen, Eric Clapton, and David Sanborn. Again, yes! THAT Eric Clapton.

Our heroes are assigned to protecting an annoying federal witness, Leo Getz. However, they also get tied up in investigating Arjen Rudd, a corrupt and murderous South African politician that is hiding behind diplomatic immunity and the vienna commission. It’s extremely frustrating. We also get introduced to a clueless South African secretary that becomes the love interest to Riggs.

This sequel took everything that worked in the first movie and magnified it! The comedy, the action and the story were all improved. The addition of Joe Pesci is welcomed and his character works really well with Riggs and Murtaugh. Arjen Rudd (Joss Ackland) is a believable villain although sometimes he starts to feel like an over-the-top James Bond antagonist, a bit theatrical for my tastes. The action is huge. They had definitely ramped it up. Giant shootouts, a lot of explosions and car chases. Michael Bay would be proud. It wouldn’t be Lethal Weapon without a final showdown and this movie has a great one.

The comedy is great. It feels so comfortable and well written. Mel Gibson is always wonderful as the Martin Riggs character. Gibson’s comedy has a familiarity that feels like he could be related to you, like an uncle or older brother that gives you a well meaning funny jab. I loved the comedy. Joe Pesci is hilarious and a great addition, Mel Gibson is on top form too. Danny Glover does the usual straight man routine of Roger Murtaugh, but is involved in the hilarious and iconic toilet bomb scene. A scene that you cannot unsee.

One thing I noticed was the product placement for things like Tales from the Crypt and Subway restaurants. That kind of thing doesn’t really bother me but it's noticeable. I had a great time watching Lethal Weapon 2. It’s an amazing sequel that hits all the checkmarks. I laughed hard and appreciated the hard-hitting action. I also love how this movie keeps pace with the original. Both are intense but this is far more flushed out. It’s a prime example of a sequel surpassing the original.

Lethal Weapon (1987) - Richard Donner

REALLY GOOD ACTION MOVIE 86/100

Lethal Weapon (86)

A full throttled action film that packs in Comedy, Explosions and intriguing storytelling. A must see for Action fans.

Directed by:
Richard Donner


Produced by:
Richard Donner & Joel Silver

Written by:
Shane Black

Starring:
Mel Gibson
Danny Glover
Gary Busey
Michael Kamen

Studio:
Silver Pictures

Distributed by:
Warner Bros.

Release date:
March 6, 1987

Running time:
110 minutes

Country:
United States

Language:
English

Budget:
$15 million

Box office:
$120.2 million

Lethal Weapon is the eighties action film that kicked off the whole buddy-cop trope in Hollywood. It’s directed by Richard Donner (Superman II) and penned by Shane Black (Predator). Our cast of stars features Danny Glover and Mel Gibson in the lead roles with Gary Busey as a henchman to the main villain, The General played by Mitchell Ryan. I decided to pair the film with a nice Indica like King Louis XIII from Marley Natural. It’s a relaxing strain that provides a good deal of happiness. A good combination to dive right into a badass picture like this. The earthy tastes and piny aromas pair well with a good beer too. If that's your kind of thing.

The film follows the pairing of two LAPD detectives. Martin Riggs is a detective that is psychologically broken and emotionally damaged following the death of his wife. Roger Murtaugh is a veteran cop that works hard to support his family. They get paired together as partners working various crimes and bonding. Roger is constantly tested by Riggs’ inherently psychotic behavior. He almost gives up. However, after things go south and the duo bands together to put an end to a very dangerous group of drug smugglers called Shadow Company.

The film features cheesy action film acting and witty dialogue, mostly between Gibson and just about everyone he comes in contact with. His Martin Riggs character is iconic. He stands as one of the best cops in movie history. Danny Glover is the perfect straight man but it’s kind of unfortunate that he was so tight cast. Busey is badass in this movie. He looks awesome and does a great job of projecting himself as menacing. Tom Atkins is good too, his role is minimal, but he gives it everything. That is up until his death, which is rather goofy looking.

Lethal Weapon also has an amazing soundtrack provided by Michael Kamen and Eric Clapton. Yes, that Eric Clapton. The howling saxophone and blazing guitar set upon a sprawling Los Angeles cityscape provide an amazing atmosphere for the story. The soundtrack provides a great technique for building suspense that gets paid off with intense action scenes.

This movie is a hell of a ride. It builds an amazing world that gets explored at break-neck speed. In some cases it’s far too fast-paced to be bad. All of the faults with the film are steamrolled by the constant action. The fight scenes are brutal and unrelenting. The final showdown is a thing of pure eighties glory. I love it. It’s a classic that should be enjoyed by everyone at least once! There’s a reason that It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia loves it so much.

The King Louis XIII paired really well with Lethal Weapon. It tasted so good, I ended up having an extra snapper or two. The cannabis had me feeling really relaxed and sunken into my couch. The uplifting effects had me alert and ready for the suspense of the action scenes, which were numerous. The effects were long lasting and are still prevalent when writing this review. Although it feels great, the taste and smell are the leading factors with this particular batch from Marley Natural. Check it out if you can!

Jingle All the Way (1996) - Brian Levant

OKAY COMEDY 67/100

Jingle All the Way is a 1996 holiday comedy film starring Arnold Schwarzenegger alongside the comedic Sinbad. It was directed by Brian Levant and produced by Chris Columbus. Levant had experience behind the camera with The Flintstone's and Beethoven, both were effective kids pictures. Jingle All the Way proved to be a fun kids movie, but it also entertains adults. It’s a fun feature that has a great atmosphere and entertainment for the whole family.

 Howard (Schwarzenegger) is an overworked mattress salesman that has been spending too much time at the office and not enough with his family. His son, Jamie (Lloyd), wants the hottest selling toy of the Christmas season. An action figure called Turboman. The problem is that Howard never bought the toy, and it’s Christmas Eve. That means Howard will have to fight his way through the horrendous shopping crowds, including a sociopathic mailman (Sinbad), in order to fulfill his son’s Christmas wishes.

It was a success at the box office, dragging in $129 million worldwide. It was met with good reviews, but critics complained about the focus of the movie being on the commercialism of Christmas. Those complaints gained some serious traction, and the movie had gotten a bit of a negative response. But it quickly died out, and the film had begun to air regularly on television during the holiday season.

Arnold Schwarzenegger had only starred in a few comedy films before this one. The bulk of his portfolio is made up with action films, but Jingle All the Way was a change of pace. The story is really basic, and it plays it safe with the plot. This was another gripe by critics. But I think that the simplicity brings more out in the characters. This is less about the story and more about watching Arnold and Sinbad act around each other in a Christmas setting.

The cast is great for this movie. Even Jake Lloyd. He wasn’t nearly as annoying as he was in Star Wars: The Phantom Menace. Phil Hartman is perfect for the role of Ted. He plays a scummy neighbor so well. The way he acted and his mannerisms, they made me want to punch him in the face. I would say that’s pretty convincing acting, considering how much I adore Hartman’s comedic genius. I also liked Sinbad. He was great and worked as the comic antagonist. It’s interesting that Joe Pesci was originally intended for this role.

I am a big fan of Arnold Schwarzenegger films and found this comedy to be hilarious. I remember seeing this movie with my family during the 1996 Christmas season at the Northridge Fashion Center in Northridge, CA. I was a kid, but I can still recall the madness of the crowds. It was and still is a topical movie that rings true with a lot of people. This is a great holiday movie that I always enjoy around Christmas. It’s fun for fans of Arnold Schwarzenegger movies and serves as something that the entire family can enjoy. There is also a quick cameo from the WWE’s Big Show as a giant Santa.

Jingle All the Way (67/100)

A good Christmas movie filled with laughs. Great for family movie night.

Director: Brian Levant
Producers: Chris Columbus, Michael Barnathan, Mark Radcliffe
Writer: Randy Kornfield
Starring: Arnold Schwarzenegger, Sinbad, Phil Hartman, Rita Wilson, Jake Lloyd, Curtis Armstrong, Robert Conrad, Jim Belushi
Studios: 1492 Pictures, 20th Century Fox
Release date: November 16, 1996
Budget: $75 million
Gross: $129.9 million

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